She haltet an' leuket aboot her, Till, seein' a stane pair o' sheers, She drappet the pock frae her shouther. Tae gi'e our aul' briggie three cheers. 'Tis here I will yoke tae my spinnin,' 'Tis here I'll mak' claith o' my yarn; Come, lassies, an' mak' a beginnin', There's some o' ye young, but ye'll learn. Scourin' an' teasin' an' a'. Cardin' an spinnin' an' a', An', lads, ye maun dye't like the heather. Wi' green on't an' red on't an' a'. The lairds will be happet in tartans, Fu' gaucy, at kirks an' at fairs, The leddies, they'll skip on your carpets, Spread out on their rooms an' their stairs ; An' aye as a pair o' true lovers May settle their min's tae be wed, They ca' for a sicht o' yet covers Tae mak' them a braw cosie bed. Walin' the figures an' a', Pricin' an' pavin' an' a', An' aye ye may wish them a blessin, Tae mak' a wheen mae o' the twa. Noo here are the men will direct you, An' pay you your wages at e'en, I'm certain they winna neglect you, Nor show you an action that's mean. The Wilsons are able an' willin' Tae dae you a faitherly turn, They'll soon mak' your saxpence a shillin', Gin ye stay about Bannockburn. Eiden' an' tenty an' a', Frien'ly an' furthy an' a', An' ay I'll be blithe whan I see In peace an' in plenty an' a'.
THE STANE PAIR O’ SHEERS
The Village of Chryston - North Lanarkshire - Scotland
Chryston
Walter Watson
The Chryston Poet
Air " Donald M'Donald." [Nearlv five hundred years, according to tradition. have passed since a bridge was built across the water Bannock by a wealthy and independent tailor who came to the ferry in haste, and wished to be rowed to the other side. The ferryman refused, telling him to wait till more came forward as he did not think it worth while to take him over alone. This nettled the knight of the thimble to such a degree, that, to avenge himself, he built, at his own expense, a bridge across the river. This was commemorated by cutting out the figure of a pair of sheers on the key-stone facing the stream.]